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The grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is distinguished from other flying fox species in Australia by its reddish-brown collar which separates its light-grey head from its dark-grey body. After birth, young flying foxes will cling to their mothers for 3 weeks as they go foraging.

The Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus Poliocephalus) Is Distinguished From Other Flying Fox Species In Australia By Its Reddish-Brown Collar Which Separates Its Light-Grey Head From Its Dark-Grey Body. After Birth, Young Flying Foxes Will Cling To Their Mothers For 3 Weeks As They Go Foraging. -

The grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) is distinguished from other flying fox species in Australia by its reddish-brown collar which separates its light-grey head from its dark-grey body. After birth, young flying foxes will cling to their mothers for 3 weeks as they go foraging.

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  1. Has there ever been an attempt to domesticate? I have this picture in my head of a roost outside my window where I can send them off into the night and also get bat cuddles when they come back.

  2. This species range has expanded since the 1980s due to something called the urban heat island effect. They used to spend summers in Melbourne but return north for winter. They started overwintering in Melbourne and now have spread across the bottom of the state and into South Australia.

    They exist as a single contiguous population along the entire east coast of Australia and up to Papua New Guinea. They establish colonies and occupy camps in patches of forest or woodland (usually along watercourses which they use to navigate). They destroy the trees they occupy, which was never a problem before European settlement as the colony would move to a new location and the damaged section of forest would recover. Now there is so much less forest, they don’t have as many places to move to, so they colonise parks and gardens which gives residents the utters. They successfully relocated the Melbourne population from the Botanic Gardens after spending a fortune on creating suitable habitat a few suburbs away, then annoying the hell out of the bats by playing music and crap ALL DAY LONG when they were trying to sleep. To their credit, the bats flew right past the proposed new campsite and took up residence along the river in Yarra Bend Park.

    I had to count the population once, as they fly out at dusk you try and count them which is hard since they like to fly around in circles for a while first for safety reasons. There were about 12000 that night but in the summer peak there are as many as 40000 at that one camp.

  3. If you listen carefully in the evenings you can hear the high pitched, “Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!” of myriad terrified baby flying foxes begging their mothers to slow down or maybe just let them stay at home this one time.

  4. About ten thousand of these fly over my house at dusk everyday, they are wonderful pollinators and are responsible for many of the beautiful flowering trees we have in Australia. Sadly they are dying by the thousands because of rising temperatures. I’m afraid If we lose them we will lose many more native plants and animals soon after.

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